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en-US 2018-05-01T12:15:35-05:00

Bimini's Location is Prime for Fishing

Offshore, Reefs or Flats: "Three in One" fishing on Bimini

Bimini sits on the western fringes of the warm gulf stream. The gulf stream carries a large quantity of migrating fish and their small quarry year-round. In addition to the migrating big game fish, local fish grow large and fat on abundant food sources. This is one reason why Bimini has great fishing year round. Whether offshore, on the reef, or in the flats, fishermen will easily have success sport fishing in Bimini. This “3 in 1” fishing paradise has attracted anglers to Bimini for decades. 

Offshore Fishing

Bimini is among the world’s most famous offshore fishing destinations. Fishing in the gulf stream (past the edge of the drop-off), offers favorable conditions to catch large ocean fish like marlin, kingfish, wahoo, and swordfish. While the gulf stream extends miles both north and south, the best deep sea fishing is toward the south of the island. When fishing over the drop-off, anglers should know that deep water is identified by a darker hue. Successful fishermen seek out the dark water and keep an eye to the west for birds. Flocking birds are a good sign of fish.

Reef Fishing

With the right bait and techniques, anglers will find ample reef fish such as snapper, grouper, and barracuda. Most anglers use chum (inedible conch or fish parts) to draw fish to their boats. It usually doesn’t take long before fishermen are reeling in substantially sized fish. An extra bonus is seeking out snorkelling spots to find conch and spiny lobster, or snorkelling of the shipwreck Sapona.

Flats Fishing

Beautiful unblemished flats and mangroves are filled with bonefish and permits around the three little islands that make up Bimini. Fishing guides typically offer scheduled full day trips from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm daily, or half day trips. Fishing the flats of Bimini are very convenience due to the islands’ proximity to Miami (about 50 miles) and light fishing pressure (only a handful of working guides). At an average of five pounds, Bimini “bones” tend to be larger than in other islands of The Bahamas.

About the Author
Kenneth Beneby

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