Bahamas My Out Island

Discover history, walk pink and white sand beaches and dive the blue holes of Long Island, in the Bahamas Out Islands.

Home to one of the oldest dive operations in the Bahamas, Long island has numerous shallow and deep dive sites, but is best known for Dean’s Blue Hole, the deepest recorded blue hole in the Bahamas (more than 600 feet). The western shoreline of the 80-mile long island has soft sandy beaches capped with rich green mangroves. With the Atlantic Ocean on the east, Long Island is a haven for fishing, sailing, and yachting in The Bahamas Out Islands.

A towering spine of ancient reef gives 80-mile Long Island, Bahamas, two faces: the dramatic cliffs and caves of the east coast that front the crashing Atlantic waves, and the soft, sandy edged lee side which slides calmly into the Bahamas Bank. Shark diving, vast schools of fish around towering coral bommies, and the spectacular wall of nearby Conception Island (a national park) are serious draws for scuba diving enthusiasts, while the angling for both bonefish and big pelagics is enough to keep any fisherman thrilled.

Cape Santa Maria Beach has been recognized by beach lovers and travel writers alike as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world. Long Island, Bahamas, is also home to Columbus Point. This towering memorial to Christopher Columbus is perched high on a hill at the island’s northern most tip where visitors can experience outstanding oceanic views.

You’ll find sloping hills in the northeast, while low hillsides make up the southern portion of the island. It’s the drastically contrasting landscape that makes so many people say that Long Island is one of the most picturesque islands in the Bahamas.

The island beckons visitors for world-class bonefishing and thrilling encounters with sea life, where divers and snorkelers explore gardens, caves, and old plantation ruins. But Long Island, Bahamas, also is a quiet island dotted with quaint, friendly villages and miles of uninterrupted beaches that offer soft pink sand changing to yellow-white. And along the way, sea shells and plenty of them.